Archives for posts with tag: garden

20111112-104445.jpg

 

I’ve been doing a little science project. In Australia, there is a quarantine zone, which means you can’t ship banana plants outside it. However you can ship embryos. And that’s exactly what Backyard Bananas did for me. They sent through very detailed instructions on what to do to help them grow into strong plants. And two weeks after planting them out, they’re still going. They’re in my greenhouse and I’ve been using eco c weed and eco aminogro to give them the best organic chance possible.

Let’s hope they keep going.

20111112-104501.jpg

I’m starting my morning reading parts of my bible – the permaculture home garden. Although we don’t follow the very brilliant Linda Woodrows directions, she has many smart ideas and tips for a backyard kitchen garden.
We are going to plant out some seedlings and potatoes today, as well as putting up wire to protect the seedlings from hungry possums.

Crop Rotation @ Fennel and Fern

I just love the way this plan is drawn:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Eat what you sew @ modish

Guest blogger Renee Garner opened my eyes to the world of selling seeds on etsy. No I just need someone to sell seeds in Australia… But if you are luck and in the US, these are her recommendations:

Mistiaggie

Myvictorygarden
Oceanic Wilderness Designs, your one stop heirloom tomato shop.

My Victory Garden’s shop for a whole assortment of colorfully nutritious (and delicious) vegetable seeds!

Sage Thymes has quite possibly the biggest collection of soybeans I’ve ever seen.

Smoky Mist Gardens has quite a selection of squash, gourds and flowers (including a really interesting selection of  brugmansias.)

tHeENDpeace.etsy.com is stocked up on a variety of eggplants and peppers.

As an honorary mention, this Teddy Bear Sunflower from fluffnflowers is just too pretty to ignore.

I know this idea is for weddings – but I think it could be beautiful anytime.

Found at Once Wed

What You’ll Need:
Several Canning Jars (1/2 pint wide mouth with the straight sides)
Several Handkerchiefs (in coordinating colors)
Ribbon
Bailing Wire
Rubber Bands
Flowers
Wire Cutters
Scissors
Iron and Ironing Board
Resources: Canning jars are easy to find at yard sales and thrift stores, so are handkerchiefs.    Bailing wire is available at any hardware store.
Directions:
1.  Press all of your handkerchiefs flat.  (if you’re going to be use these in a humid location, I would suggest using a little spray starch to help keep them crisp)
2. Fold the bottom of your handkerchief up (see figure 1) and the top of the handkerchief down (see figure 2) to create a band of fabric that is the same height as the jar.   Press the folds.
3.  Cut a 2 1/2 foot length of bailing wire.   Wrap it tightly around the grooves in the top of the jar,  then create a hanger.  (see figure 3)
4.  Wrap the folded handkerchief around the vase and secure it with a rubber band.  (see figure 4)
5.   Cut a length of ribbon (about 18 inches or so) and tie it around the vase to conceal the rubber band. Tie the tails in a bow.  (see figure 5)
6.  Add a little water in the bottom of your vase, insert the flowers.  ( see figure 6)
7.  Create a grouping of coordinating vases and hang from a tree, and arbor, or from the ceiling.
What it Cost:
Handkerchiefs $.25 – $3.00 each
Ribbon $.25 a yard
Bailing wire $3 for a 50 foot spool

Jars, if purchased new are about $9 for one dozen (but they are easily found for much less when used)